Kids Playing Soccer

In the U.S. the popularity of soccer—or fútbol as it is known in the Hispanic community—is on the upswing, and viewership of the World Cup in Brazil surpassed all expectations. But now, new evidence about the dangers of repeated head trauma could lead to changes in the game. Berkowitz and Hanna LLC is talking about that today. Nueva evidencia sobre los peligros de trauma craneal podría cambiar las reglas de juego para el fútbol.

The story of Pat Grange, a former soccer player at the collegiate and semi-professional levels, is one that may serve as a cautionary tale. Throughout his career he often headed the ball. At the age of 28 he was diagnosed with ALS, and in 2012, at 29, he died. Here is his story:

After his death, his brain was examined and there was “dramatic damage.” CTE, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, the same thing found in the brains of football players with. Doctors said his was a case of “trauma-linked ALS.” Though Pat had only two known concussions, he repetitive hits to the head from “heading” the ball during fútbol practice and games.

As safety measures—like taking “heading” out of the game for young children—are considered, Berkowitz and Hanna LLC will keep an eye on this issue. Como siempre, en Berkowitz and Hanna LLC los mantendremos informados.

Image by MSC Academy U12 Green via Flickr.com